Skip to main content

GREG EIMAN

Copy and Paste for each class

 

Art  period 1 -   qmnm3ph

 

Photo period 3-   sm6wldn

 

Photo Period 4- h3njbj2

 

Art Period 6- h3njbj2

 

Advisory-   onedfp2

  

Gregory Eiman is inviting you to a scheduled Zoom meeting.

Topic: Eiman Zoom (all)

 

Time: This is a recurring meeting Meet anytime

 

Join Zoom Meeting
https://esuhsd.zoom.us/j/82937045732?pwd=VjVrWFhWanFGWFZwM1NtbkV2Q01mUT09

Copy and Paste for each class

 

Art 

 

Photo

 

Advisory

 

CyberHigh  

 

Greg Eiman

Room b100

eimang@esuhsd.org

 

SYLLABUS FOR HIGH SCHOOL ART I

 

Purpose: High School Art 1 is a course that provides an introduction to art through a multi-media experience. Students will learn and apply the elements and principles of design to produce creative art projects that reflect their understanding of these concepts.

 

Materials: A wide variety of materials.  Some include paint, pencil, chalk, cardboard, hand-tools. Right now due to the pandemic supplies are limited.

                 

1. Portfolios- Used to store artwork in the classroom

2. Sketchbook- Used to draw, write, and explain artwork.

3. Textbook- “Art Talk” text book.

 

Grading: Your grade in art will come from the following: Doing what is assigned and meeting the objectives of the project. Your finished piece of work.  Originality of your work.  Being neat and careful.  Using your class time wisely. Going above and beyond the project assigned (creativity). Using your ability to the fullest.

 

Students will never earn ZEROS, only a 59.  Anything below that makes it more difficult for a student to get into the passing grade point average. 

 

 

Grading Scale:

A 100-90

B 89-80

C 79-70

D 69-60

F 59

 

Units of study

Unit 1: VALUE: Pencil grades. Contour drawings. Value, line, and texture in sketchbook. Value scales and techniques grid with pencil. Texture differences drawings/ 4 tasks. Drawing brown bags. Drawing bugs. Drawing plants. Seeing solids. Still life drawings.

 

Unit 2: SPACE/PERSPECTIVE: Perspective worksheet. 2-point perspective boxes. 2-point perspective name design. Perspective project. Mixed up grids.

 

Unit 3: LINE: Pen and Ink Practice techniques.

 

Unit 4: TEXTURE: Texture in pencil drawing. Embossed copper project.

 

Unit 5: SHAPE: Floral tracery. Construction paper sports figure.

 

Unit 6: COLOR: Discussion of color terms and theory including: monochromatic, complementary, primary, secondary, intermediate, value, tint, shade, tone, hue, neutral, analogous, warm, and cool. Value scales (tint, tone, and shade). Color theory charts. Color wheels Monochromatic painting Warm or Cool painting.

 

Unit 7: FORM: Cardboard and wood.

 

Unit 8: PRINCIPLES OF DESIGN: Balance, Contrast, Emphasis, Movement, Pattern, Rhythm, Unity, Variety.

 

 

Zoom Meetings:  Students will be required attend every zoom meeting as a form of daily attendance and for instructional/learning purposes.  Links will be posted on my Calero School Loop home page.  Students are required to adhere to the zoom expectations outline found here.

 

Contacting Teacher

Google text/phone…. (831) 295-8412.  (Fastest way to contact me)

Email… eimang@esuhsd.org

Phone- (408) 347-7600

 

Course Title:   Digital Photography 1

School Year of Proposed Pilot:  2013-14

 

ZOOM EXPECTIONS!!!!  click here.

 

 

Form B:  Course Outline

 

Course Catalog Description:

 Digital Photography 1 is a year long introductory level Visual Arts course were students in the 9th - 12 grades have the opportunity to study the elements and principles of design/art as they apply to digital photographic images.  The students will study history of modern day photography to the current  technological age. Students will be creating photographs from digital cameras and manipulations in computer  photo editing software, scanning, uploading, downloading, importing, printing. Students will look at the formal, expressive and aesthetic properties of photographic art.

 

Visual Arts State Content Standards/Common Core State Standards for Technology Subjects:

1.0 ARTISTIC PERCEPTION

Processing, Analyzing, and Responding to Sensory Information Through the Language and Skills Unique to the Visual Arts

Students perceive and respond to works of art, objects in nature, events, and the environment. They also use the vocabulary of the visual arts to express their observations.

Develop Perceptual Skills and Visual Arts Vocabulary

1.1 Identify and use the principles of design to discuss, analyze, and write about visual aspects in the environment and in works of art, including their own.

1.2 Describe the principles of design as used in works of art, focusing on dominance and subordination.

Analyze Art Elements and Principles of Design

1.3 Research and analyze the work of an artist and write about the artist's distinctive style and its contribution to the meaning of the work.

1.4 Analyze and describe how the composition of a work of art is affected by the use of a particular principle of design.

Impact of Media Choice

1.5 Analyze the material used by a given artist and describe how its use influences the meaning of the work.

1.6 Compare and contrast similar styles of works of art done in electronic media with those done with materials traditionally used in the visual arts.

2.0 CREATIVE EXPRESSION

Creating, Performing, and Participating in the Visual Arts

Students apply artistic processes and skills, using a variety of media to communicate meaning and intent in original works of art.

Skills, Processes, Materials, and Tools 

2.1 Solve a visual arts problem that involves the effective use of the elements of art and the principles of design.

2.2 Prepare a portfolio of original two-and three-dimensional works of art that reflects refined craftsmanship and technical skills.

2.3 Develop and refine skill in the manipulation of digital imagery (either still or video).

2.4 Review and refine observational drawing skills.

Communication and Expression Through Original Works of Art

2.5 Create an expressive composition, focusing on dominance and subordination.

2.6 Create a two or three-dimensional work of art that addresses a social issue.

3.0 HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT

Understanding the Historical Contributions and Cultural Dimensions of the Visual Arts

Students analyze the role and development of the visual arts in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting human diversity as it relates to the visual arts and artists.

Role and Development of the Visual Arts

3.1 Identify similarities and differences in the purposes of art created in selected cultures.

3.2 Identify and describe the role and influence of new technologies on contemporary works of art.

Diversity of the Visual Arts

3.3 Identify and describe trends in the visual arts and discuss how the issues of time, place, and cultural influence are reflected in selected works of art.

3.4 Discuss the purposes of art in selected contemporary cultures.

4.0 AESTHETIC VALUING

Responding to, Analyzing, and Making Judgments About Works in the Visual Arts

Students analyze, assess, and derive meaning from works of art, including their own, according to the elements of art, the principles of design, and aesthetic qualities.

Derive Meaning 

4.1 Articulate how personal beliefs, cultural traditions, and current social, economic, and political contexts influence the interpretation of the meaning or message in a work of art.

4.2 Compare the ways in which the meaning of a specific work of art has been affected over time because of changes in interpretation and context.

Make Informed Judgments 

4.3 Formulate and support a position regarding the aesthetic value of a specific work of art and change or defend that position after considering the views of others. 

4.4 Articulate the process and rationale for refining and reworking one of their own works of art.

4.5 Employ the conventions of art criticism in writing and speaking about works of art.

5.0 CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS

Connecting and Applying What Is Learned in the Visual Arts to Other Art Forms and Subject Areas and to Careers

Students apply what they learn in the visual arts across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and management of time and resources that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to the visual arts.

Connections and Applications

5.1 Design an advertising campaign for a theatre or dance production held at a school, creating images that represent characters and major events in the production.

5.2 Create a work of art that communicates a cross-cultural or universal theme taken from literature or history.

Visual Literacy

5.3 Compare and contrast the ways in which different media (television, newspapers, magazines) cover the same art exhibition.

Careers and Career-Related Skills

5.4 Demonstrate an understanding of the various skills of an artist, art critic, art historian, art collector, art gallery owner, and philosopher of art (aesthetician).

Questions: State Board of Education | 916-319-0827 

Common Core Standards for Technology Subjects grades 9-12

 

Writing Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, and Technical Subjects 6–12

Grades 6–8 students: Grades 9–10 students: Grades 11–12 students:

Production and Distribution of Writing

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which

the development, organization, and style are

appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which

the development, organization, and style are

appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which

the development, organization, and style are

appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

5. With some guidance and support from peers and

adults, develop and strengthen writing as needed

by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a

new approach, focusing on how well purpose and

audience have been addressed.

5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by

planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying

a new approach, focusing on addressing what

is most significant for a specific purpose and

audience.

5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by

planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying

a new approach, focusing on addressing what

is most significant for a specific purpose and

audience.

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce

and publish writing and present the relationships

between information and ideas clearly and

efficiently.

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce,

publish, and update individual or shared writing

products, taking advantage of technology’s

capacity to link to other information and to display

information flexibly and dynamically.

6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce,

publish, and update individual or shared writing

products in response to ongoing feedback,

including new arguments or information.

Research to Build and Present Knowledge

7. Conduct short research projects to answer a

question (including a self-generated question),

drawing on several sources and generating

additional related, focused questions that allow for

multiple avenues of exploration.

7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research

projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated

question) or solve a problem; narrow or

broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize

multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating

understanding of the subject under investigation.

7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research

projects to answer a question (including a selfgenerated

question) or solve a problem; narrow or

broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize

multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating

understanding of the subject under investigation.

8. Gather relevant information from multiple print

and digital sources, using search terms effectively;

assess the credibility and accuracy of each source;

and quote or paraphrase the data and conclusions

of others while avoiding plagiarism and following

a standard format for citation.

8. Gather relevant information from multiple

authoritative print and digital sources, using

advanced searches effectively; assess the

usefulness of each source in answering the

research question; integrate information into the

text selectively to maintain the flow of ideas,

avoiding plagiarism and following a standard

format for citation.

8. Gather relevant information from multiple

authoritative print and digital sources, using

advanced searches effectively; assess the

strengths and limitations of each source in terms

of the specific task, purpose, and audience;

integrate information into the text selectively to

maintain the flow of ideas, avoiding plagiarism and

overreliance on any one source and following a

standard format for citation.

9. Draw evidence from informational texts to support

analysis reflection, and research.

9. Draw evidence from informational texts to support

analysis, reflection, and research.

9. Draw evidence from informational texts to support


 

Intended Goals and Objectives:

Digital Photography I is a year-long introductory level Visual Arts class where students in the 9th -12th grade have the opportunity to experiment with digital  photographic equipment, digital photographic manipulation computer programs, image making or manipulating equipment, elements and principles of design/art ideas and concepts to create photographic and/or digital art images.  Students will study the elements and principles of design/art as they apply to digital photographic images, photographic images from black and white and color film era, focusing on the sensory, formal, expressive and aesthetic properties of photographic art and will examine closely the history and development of photography.


 

Methods and Examples of Assignments:

In the first semester students will:

  • study the camera, its parts and functions and make photographs, (1.1; 1.2),

 

  • study the art of oral and written critiquing of photographs using technical photographic and art vocabulary (4.3; 4.4; 4.5),

  • acquire the technical skills (an understanding of shutter speeds, aperture openings, depth of field/perspective, studio and natural lighting, motion, etc.) of photography necessary to communicate their ideas in this medium. (1.4),

 

  • study the history of photography and produce photographs using the elements of design/art as applied to photography, line, shape, form, space, color, value, and texture, (3.1; 3.2; 3.3; 3.4)

 

  • study the history of photography and aesthetic theories of emotionalism, expressionism, formalism, functionalism, and realism and produce photographs representative of those aesthetic theories,  (3.1; 3.2; 3.3; 3.4)

 

  • study and produce photographs using “depth of field,”

 

  • study and produce photographs using figure-ground relationships,

 

  • Begin to develop a personal style and discover an area of concentration for use in portfolio development.

 

In the second semester students will:

 

  • study the principles of design/art as applied to photography, rhythm, movement, pattern, balance, proportion, variety, unity, emphasis, and harmony,

 

  • study photographic emotionalism, expressionism, formalism, functionalism, and realism through detailed photographic projects culminating in finished works,

 

  • study perspective views achievable with a digital camera, including, but not limited to, one point, two point, bird’s eye and worm’s eye perspectives,

 

  • study reflections and how to photograph and/or avoid them

 

  • use more technically advanced photographic equipment including professional lighting,

 

  • increase their personalized student photographic portfolio with detailed work linked with cultural and artistic traditions of photographing people, dancers in motion,  architecture/interiors, jewelry, products, food, fashion and 2d and 3d artworks, (3.3),

 

  • continue their study of photographic history, photographers, entertainment/media and other careers, (5.4)

 

  • produce a finalized general works and concentration portfolio of finished photographic images.

    

Writing Assignments: will include descriptive writing and Feldman’s Art Criticism Steps as well as journaling the photographs either from the student or the likes of the worlds greatest photographers in Fine Arts and Commercial Arts.



 

Key Assignments:    

  Such as;

Parts of the Camera and their functions

Photojournalism

Food Photography

Product Photography (book and internet)

Advertising Photography (book and Internet)

Fashion Photography

Nature Photography

Research Paper on Photographers and or Subjects of Photography



 

Scope and Sequence 1st semester:

 

History of photography 

various computer skills taught throughout stages of semesters 

camera parts 

Aperture priority 

Shutter priority 

what is a portfolio 

Elements of Art and Photography( lighting included) 

 

Scope and Sequence 2nd semester

 

various computer skills more advanced than first semester... reinforcing learned 1st semester skills 

Depth of field 

Action  - sports using shutter speed manipulations 

Famous Photographers 

Alternative processes using digital photography similar to and dark 

room processes 






 

Each week/unit includes the following components:  art/photography project; historical content and cultural relationship study via textbooks and/or supplemental resource materials produced/created uploaded and offered by instructor/teacher to students via internet; and,  Connections, Relations and Applications are infused into the course via review of the photographic work of famous photographers with discussions as to the photographic relationships to drawing, painting, sculpture, architecture, film, entertainment industry, college majors and each type of photographic business enterprise like portrait photography, wedding photography, product photography, food styling and photography, photojournalism, and fashion photography, etc.  


 

5.  Instructional Methods and or Strategies:

This course combines lecture, demonstration and studio practices and lab experience. Students work on their individual projects in consultation with the instructor. They will also participate in critiques throughout the year, to teach aesthetic values and to engage in the practice of art criticism. Students will learn to critique their own work and that of their classmates in a productive, 

open and positive environment. Photo history will be taught through student reports and teacher presentations. Lab time will be a part of the classroom experience. 

Students will be given the course description sheet. Students will gain an understanding of classroom procedures and requirements for success. Information will cover use of equipment, evaluation rubrics, and course standards. The students will complete a survey regarding what types of photographic equipment they might have access to at home.

 

All units will begin with a short lecture regarding historical and contemporary photographers’ works that are pertinent to the area of study under discussion. A demonstration of processes will be given by the instructor, accompanied by technical notes. Every student will be required to keep a notebook, where they will retain and organize technical information regarding equipment use and processes. Students will also be provided with information from presentations regarding the works of historic and contemporary photographic artists and their aesthetic philosophies, which they should keep for personal reference. Students will share their own thought processes in the form of notes and thumbnails as they explore their use of the medium. The notebook will also contain journal entries regarding the students’ experiences with the various processes, as well as ideas for personal expression and growth within these processes. All written critiques will also be kept in the notebook. In this way, their notebook will provide the students with a map of their journey in photography as an artistic medium, as well as, it will offer them a useful resource for further exploration into the photographic arts.

 

6. Assessment Methods and or Tools:

Students are expected to be able to situate their own work within a tradition, to use the qualitative language appropriate to the discipline when involved in critique and self-evaluation. Students establish their own goals for growth in photography. The teacher will evaluate individual images based on a rubric. The following areas will be reviewed for mastery:

 

Competent and Creative Camera Control

Competent and Creative use of Software

Competent and Creative use of Compositional Elements

Creative and Expressive Content

Process and Productivity

Student Portfolios will be evaluated through:

Student presentations, exhibits, and competitions - team and/or individual.

On-going and cumulative portfolio record of performance and investigative accomplishments

Individual and group assessments of content, presentation quality and process

Opportunities for self-assessment and peer-assessment in the form of written and/ or classroom critique

 

General Photography Rubric

Criteria

Mastered

A

Accomplished

Satisfactory

C

Weak

D

Student Grade

Instructor Grade

Impact

The visual impression, emotional content or social message contained within the image

Memorable Original Elegant

Strong appeal

Fresh

Attractive

Creative

Interesting

Informative, 

Appealing, 

 

Somewhat interesting

Ordinary, 

Unconvincing,

Copied, 

Poor choice of subject

   

Composition

The use of art concepts in arrangement of the image:  Framing, Leading lines, Rule of Thirds, Diagonal movement, Simplicity, Patterns

Nicely balanced Strong Unity

Dominant Center of Interest

Dynamic Variety and Contrast

Has command of compositional techniques that direct the viewers attention 

No mergers

No distracting background details 

Excellent lighting

Stable balance

Ordered

Creates a Center of Interest, 

Contains Variety and Contrast, Uses compositional techniques that direct the viewers attention

Minimal distractions in background, Minor Mergers, Good lighting

Poor Balance

Fragmented, Unclear focal point

Less Variety or Contrast

Less convincing use of compositional techniques that direct the viewers attention

Some distractions in the background

Some Mergers

Acceptable light

Unbalanced

No Clear focal point

Monotonous, flat or weak contrast  -  Too much contrast

Lacks convincing use of compositional techniques that direct the viewer attention, Chaotic background Poor lighting

   

Technical Skill

Following procedures while maintaining  good craftsmanship:

Needs cropping, 

Needs burning, 

Needs dodging, Needs more contrast, (3-5 filter)

Needs less contrast (3-0 filter)

 

Excellent exposure, Absolutely no dust or scratches, 

Absolutely no fingerprints

Focused and crisp

Depth of Field enhances the image

 

Good exposure

Minimal dust,

Scratches or fingerprints, 

No discernable discolorations 

Focused

Depth of Field good

 

Slight exposure problems 

(overexposed or underexposed)

Some scratches, dust, or fingerprints

Soft Focus

Depth of Field problems

 

Significantly over or underexposed

Too many scratches, dust, fingerprints

Unfocused/ blurred

Poorly crafted Depth of Field distracting

   

Student Comment(s)

           

Instructor Comment(s)

           






 

Photo Skills - Lab Digital Darkroom

In Class

Skills / Topics

Lab / Digital Darkroom

Skills / Assignments

Intro

Snapshots vs photo Image and art

(magazines, images that capture your attention)

Composition Rule of Thirds Golden Mean

Definition Rule of thirds

Use of line, diagonal, horizontal, leading

Magazine Images, Applying composition

Camera Usage (expectations) and basic controls, Auto

Batteries. Lens cleaning, Inserting Cards, on/off, viewfinder vs screen

Image Assignment

Applying Rule of Thirds, Use of Line, Find an S curve

Downloading Photos

Lab / Digital Darkroom, Adding /

Create Network Place

Workflow Expectations /

Creating folders Composition /

cropping tool / size and resolution

Open / Save an image – PSD v Jpeg

Viewing PSD v Jpeg Creating /flat. Layers Print a contact sheet: 

Cropping and saving the edited mage.

Workflow – saving directions

Camera Settings

Auto, In Camera Presets

Composition II – analyzing your images – Evaluate your Best Image

Image assignment II

Improving Composition – minimize cropping

Create new file / download images

Contact Sheet 2 – 4x6 @ 300 1 – 5x7 BEST Evaluation








 

Necessary Equipment for a class of 33 students

 

10 -30  digital cameras  

    5 DSLR  Canon Rebel XTI or the like ( ability to use manual operations for focus, aperture, shutter speed)

    5 Nikon 1 or the like  (ability to use manual operations for focus, aperture, shutter speed)

 

15-30 Mac computers ( Mac preferred as it is designed more for the artist in mind as well as excellent capabilities for visual display and editing)

  loaded with Adobe Creative Suite including Photoshop, Illustrator, Indesign

if no Photoshop , Aperture or the like for professional like software industry uses

 

Printers for Photo printing  (Epson prefered as a inkjet printer  as it is best at digital output for artistic photographs and use of replacement cartridges come not as one cartridge but separate cartridges for separate colors to be filled when needed)

printer cartridges separate cartridges for each color

printer photo paper costco puts out a fantastic photo paper for students at one of the lowest prices in the market. Other brands such as Epson and some selected printer papers from “Freestyle photographic supply” company in Hollywood is ever expanding and increasing its paper availability to the  digital printing photographic processes

 

flash drive (or USB Drive) with a minimum of 4 GB for each student

internet connection  and storage component consistent for holding student work that is not going to  be printed but viewed for grading  

 

 

 

Greg Eiman is your Photography and Art Teacher at Calero High School, and this year will have Seniors for his Advisory/Cyber High class.  This will be his 6th year at Calero, and also his 6th year in public education.  Double majoring at Franklin Pierce University he earned a Bachelors of Fine Arts and Bachelors of Art Educaiton k-12.  That would mean Greg is an east coast native and was born and raised in northern New Jersey.  

 

When he is not found in the classroom or zooming online with students he is found in his woodworking workshop, or spending time in nature either on a mountain bike or surfboard.  Greg loves to go camping with his custom wooden teardrop trailer (which he built) all over North America.  He has a big love of traveling and most recently did a 7000+ mile road trip with his teardrop trailer covering all of the northern US states and lower Canadian territories.  Greg also runs his own handyman/carpentry business.  

 

Although school year is unlike years in the past he remains open to the possibilities, and innovations that can occur. He is looking forward to the school year and connecting with all of his students.  

Art 1 Calendar
Month
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
Month
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
Photo 1 Calendar
Month
S
M
T
W
T
F
S
Month
Sun
Mon
Tue
Wed
Thu
Fri
Sat
GREG EIMAN Locker